The least helpful Amazon user movie reviews

Film: Taxi Driver

Roger Ebert’s take:

This utter aloneness is at the center of “Taxi Driver,” one of the best and most powerful of all films, and perhaps it is why so many people connect with it even though Travis Bickle would seem to be the most alienating of movie heroes. We have all felt as alone as Travis. Most of us are better at dealing with it.

Ted V’s take:

The only reason I watched it is because John Hinckley was let out of prison and said the movie caused him to shoot Reagan.


Film: Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen

Roger Ebert’s take:

“Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen” is a horrible experience of unbearable length, briefly punctuated by three or four amusing moments. One of these involves a dog-like robot humping the leg of the heroine. Such are the meager joys. If you want to save yourself the ticket price, go into the kitchen, cue up a male choir singing the music of hell, and get a kid to start banging pots and pans together. Then close your eyes and use your imagination.

This is the second most amazing one

Film: Blue Velvet

“Blue Velvet” contains scenes of such raw emotional energy that it’s easy to understand why some critics have hailed it as a masterpiece. A film this painful and wounding has to be given special consideration.
I was not what I had hoped it would be. But then, I bought it for the cast. Some times disappointment follows.

Film: Y Tu Mama Tambien

It is clear Cuaron is a gifted director, and here he does his best work to date. Why did he return to Mexico to make it? Because he has something to say about Mexico, obviously, and also because Jack Valenti and the MPAA have made it impossible for a movie like this to be produced in America. It is a perfect illustration of the need for a workable adult rating: too mature, thoughtful and frank for the R, but not in any sense pornographic. Why do serious film people not rise up in rage and tear down the rating system that infantilizes their work?
 Ok if you want porno.

Film: Schindler’s List

At the end of the film, there is a sequence of overwhelming emotional impact, involving the actual people who were saved by Schindler. We learn that “Schindler’s Jews” and their descendants today number about 6,000 and that the Jewish population of Poland is 4,000. The obvious lesson would seem to be that Schindler did more than a whole nation to spare its Jews. That would be too simple. The film’s message is that one man did something, while in the face of the Holocaust others were paralyzed.
It wasn’t very appropriate to watch with my 13yr daughter. We expected something similar to the pianist. The pianist was better.

Film: The Pianist

Polanski himself is a Holocaust survivor, saved at one point when his father pushed him through the barbed wire of a camp. He wandered Krakow and Warsaw, a frightened child, cared for by the kindness of strangers. His own survival (and that of his father) are in a sense as random as Szpilman’s, which is perhaps why he was attracted to this story. Steven Spielberg tried to enlist him to direct “Schindler’s List,” but he refused, perhaps because Schindler’s story involved a man who deliberately set out to frustrate the Holocaust, while from personal experience Polanski knew that fate and chance played an inexplicable role in most survivals.
Have not looked at it yet.
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